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There were several very odd entries in ADA 2004 this year, which I think should deserve mention as everyone discusses the progress (stagnation?) of aquascaping:

This entry from the Ukraine is absolutely beautiful and unique. Notice that he used relatively common Vallisneria, Java moss, Najas, Anubias, and Cryptocorynes to create this layout:


Perhaps bridges aren't totally unique, but this little tank from Japan looks quite unusual to my eye. The lush, fluffy moss is amazing:


A panoramic, enormous aquarium using solely a Cryptocoryne sp, Java moss, and Hemianthus callitrichoides. Designed by Oliver Knott but seemingly maintained by Willi Kuppler of France:


This aquascape gets my vote for weirdest aquascape, ever! I took a double-take when I first saw this one. The plants are very healthy, nonetheless. He chose mostly new plants for his aquascape, such as the red Rotala sp. Goias, Hemianthus callitrichoides, and Ranunculus papulentus in the foreground:


Interesting idea by another entry from Japan. Instead of prominent wood arrangement, he chose to create terraces with the rock and let Glosso grow amongst it:


An entry from Taiwan with wooden pillars jutting up through the tank. Interesting idea, although I personally don't think it looks that attractive:


Beginnings of the American design style? You decide, although I never thought that minimalism was very American -- I don't know how many would follow it in this country:


Carlos
 

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Yes. What I meant was it is similar - but I am not sure it is the same one. But then again, perhaps it is 'grown in' to use that controversial platitude.

Andrew Cribb
 

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Number 76 is very interesting, unique and perhaps can lead the imagination in several different directions. My first thought is it looks like a bunch of Poodle tails sticking out of the landscape.... :oops:

But I give all of them credit for being something a little different and yet very appealing. To me those who are brave enough to not follow the flock and try something new are the ones who will be noticed later. :)
 

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I like that angel tank with the vertical wood a lot. It's reminescent of a root overhang in the wet season when the Angels are out and about doing their flooded forest thing. Very interesting!
 

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does anyone have copies of the ADA entries from a couple of years ago where the aquariums were pastoral scenes with pigs and such
 

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I am just wondering, after having looked at all these pictures, whether it's possible if anyone did or had set up a scape solely using already-grown plants from other tanks, and thereafter take photographs. Is this a commonly practiced habit? Would this be considered cheating? I seem to recall Oliver Knott using Riccia or some other matt as part of the foreground in one of his tanks. So I guess I am saying, has anyone ever taken this practice to another level, perhaps a higher notch, by building everything from that method? In my opinion, though, maybe this isn't such a bad idea. Similar to an artist doing a painting, he would need various colors on a palette coupled with different sized brushes. In this way, an aquscaper could take already grown plants from other tanks; perhaps a tank solely set up to grow healthy plants in an ordered manner, like different color paints in a box. He could pick and choose which plants he would like to put in a tank. Then, after which he can take pictures and enter them into contests.

On second thought, the reason I suddenly had this thought is after I saw #34. For one thing, the artist could've put in those round rocks any time; doesn't have to be from the beginning of the tank's set up. He could've put them in minutes before he took the pictures. This idea is what gave me thought/doubts about my aforementioned statements. I am by no means accusing anyone of cheating, if this is indeed considered so. Please enlighten me on this thought; thank you!


Paul
 

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I really like 120. It looks like a rainforest and the trees are stretching up towards the light. It also gave me the impression of pylons of a pier or wharf.
 

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My apologies. Tripod does not allow offsite linking. Here are the images uploaded to APC's Gallery.





 

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Phil Edwards wrote:
I like that angel tank with the vertical wood a lot. It's reminescent of a root overhang in the wet season when the Angels are out and about doing their flooded forest thing. Very interesting!
I like the the vertical wood a lot, too. I think what spoils the effect of the wood is that large, bright, rather unregulated clump of Sagittaria, or whatever it is in the middle foreground. It does not blend in with the vertical wood; rather, it tends to obscure it.
 

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tsunami said:
An entry from Taiwan with wooden pillars jutting up through the tank. Interesting idea, although I personally don't think it looks that attractive:
Personally, I love it. I think it looks VERY natural. It looks very similar to habitats I've seen snorkeling in local waterways where bases of trees and shrubs are submerged. The plantings are somewhat haphazard but still consistent and fairly homogenous, giving the impression of just a few species which have managed to gain a foothold and establish that small area. I like that it is just in a small area, which would very likely happen in nature if that was the only spot that got a decent amount of sunlight, inhibiting growth elsewhere among the trees, etc. The impression of depth in this tank is fantastic.

Beautiful.
 
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