Aquatic Plant Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Premium Member
Joined
·
7,439 Posts
If you have 56 watts over a 29G tank, that would be low light (1.93wpg). That is enough to grow low light plants, like: Anubias, mosses, crypts, horwort etc..

A 2 x 36 is 72 watts which would give you 2.48 wpg. This would be considered low-medium light setup. In this case you could grow a little more variety of plants.
I disagree. "High light" is the light intensity that lets you grow almost all of the typical aquatic plants, with possibly some problems with ground cover plants. "Low light" lets you grow anubias, mosses, cryptps, ferns, etc., but will not let you grow plants that demand lots of light. And, only Marsilea is likely to survive as carpet type plant.

For a typical shape tank, using PC lights with reflectors similar to AH Supply reflectors, 2 watts per gallon is borderline "high light", 1.3 or so is borderline "low light". Both cases are for lights that are around 2 inches above the water. Raise the lights and the numbers change drastically.

If the 56 watts are PC bulbs with good reflectors, you can grow most plants, so that is borderline "high light", not low-medium light. If the 56 watts are ordinary shop lights, with their white painted housing serving as a reflector, it is low light.

This is, of course, just my opinion and is subject to change as I learn more.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
7,439 Posts
The Coralife fixture doesn't seem to have the typical individual reflectors that T5 lights usually have, and the single reflector it seems to have doesn't look like it is anything special. Without seeing a better photo of it or seeing one of these in person I guess it is similar to an AH Supply reflector. If it had the individual reflectors many people find that type of T5 light gives as much light intensity as PC bulb fixtures having around 1.3 to 1.5 times as much wattage. This one probably is not that good. So I would count the 36 watts as good for 1.2 watts per gallon, and the shop light as good for maybe another .5 or so watts per gallon of PC bulbs, giving a total of around 1.7 watts per gallon PC AH Supply equivalent intensity. That would be low light intensity, as Trena said, in my opinion. CO2 always helps, even with low light intensity, but you don't absolutely have to use it.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top