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Ahoj Jirko! Glad to see another guy from Slovakia here :)

1. I guess the safest way how to answer this is to use water tests. If there are plenty of healthy and fast growing plants and NO2 is zero and NO3 low enough for a few days, it should be safe to add livestock. One has to be careful with soils containing high amount of artificial fertilizer. Nitrate respiration might occur (NO3 is converted to NO2) after few days after soil submersion. Waiting for months is a bit overkill, even if it's a safe bet (although, depending on the soil used, you might starve your plants). For impatient people it's a good idea to have selective ion resin (Szat clear water in our region) at hand and use it in emergency when NO2/NO3 is too high.

2. I think that Diana's recommendation is good. Plants which grow like a weed in one tank will just slowly die off in another. Providing an abundance of species will ensure that at least some are going to get a strong hold in the tank. It is expected that maybe only half are going to survive and spread across the aquarium (but you can't really tell which ones exactly in advance). E.g. I had an extremely good success with Sagittaria subulata in one tank, yet it won't grow at all in the second one, no matter what I do.

3. I tried to run a nano tank without a filter. Technically it worked absolutely fine, yet I noticed increased growth of plants and more lively behavior of fish with a little bit of water movement. I believe that filter in terms of biological filtration is not essential, but water movement is beneficial to plants and livestock as well.

Just my 2 cents :)
Hello Jirka,

Sorry, I didn't get to your questions sooner. Honestly, I think that Mysiak answers your questions here beautifully--probably better than I could. :)

Welcome to APC!

Diana
 

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Hello Diana,

thank You a very much for you answer!

I want to oppose in one think: The plants, that you give a large amount, will will often grow best. I've never lost a single Cryptocoryne becketii, affinis, pontederiifolia, usteriana, wendtii, evae, Tropica, Flamingo, cordata, legroi, Mi Oya, tonkinensis. Every single cyptocoryne I plant, grows. The same is Vallisneria gigantea, Valisneria spiralis, Aponogeton crispus, Anubias barteri, Monosolenium tenerum, Pogostemon quadrifolius, Stuckenia pectinata, Zosterella dubia, Echinodorus Amazonicus, Tropica, Lodwigia repens, Najas horrida, Nymphaea zenkeri, Lomariopsis lineata and a lot of other plants. When you can do the aquarium a bit and you use large amount from one species, they will grow. Of course, is possible, that sometimes it not work, but thist risiko is smaller then 50%. So the best, what you can do is plan ahead a little :). My opinion.
 

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Impressive! To grow many species in the same tank, I had to keep the more enthusiastic species under control. That means monitoring the tanks and occasionally pruning and thinning. (I routinely had to snip off Cryptocoryne sp at the roots to keep them from taking over tanks.)

Some people, in contrast, are just happy to get plant growth of any kind and are not interested in managing their tanks. It's a personal choice.

Send us a picture of your tank with all these species so that we can be inspired! (I assume that you are not injecting CO2.)
 

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The material seems to have perlite in it, which can cause you to have to remove the floaters many times as it gets away from the cap on the substrate. It isn't harmful, but it is a nuisance. You would possibly find a better material if it was an un-branded material, where adding things to the mix isn't done much. I used "Black Gold" from Ace Hardware and had good results with it.
 

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My concern is the added ferts that are listed. This product was recommended to me by a club member . I have read several articles recommending to get soil without added ferts.
 

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The added material is mostly natural, though (feather meal, bone meal, etc.) which means it’s mostly a slow release. That’s something I would aim for in a soil for substrate purposes. Aside from the perlite (as mentioned above), I would not hesitate in the least on using this.
 
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