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Discussion Starter #1
I have an algae that is similar to thread algae, but when I try to remove it it simply breaks up and spreads around the tank. I'm beginning to worry that it will soon overcome my tank. What is it and how to I fight it? My amano's don't seem to be touching it-in fact, they seem more interested in the substrate than in any of the algae in my tank.

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok, here it is. It's attached to the tops of the Didiplis diandra and the rotala. There's also one floating in the water closer to the pic. Sorry for the fuzzy photo-the good camera is out of the house right now.

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I suppose I'll need to get a nitrate kit then. I haven't used/owned any water testing so far because I've never had to deal with this problem. Would the nitrates be too high or too low for this algae to start taking over? Also, would this have anything to do with my rotala starting to grow sideways rather than straight? I'm noticing that my plants are not looking too good. Do I have too much lighting with just DIY CO2 and the nutrient reset method? Sorry about all the questions.

Thanks,
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Low nitrates tends to be characteristically when this algae shows up. You probably don't need to get a nitrate test kit, though it might be useful for your own personal knowledge or future problems.

The rotalas growing sideways is due to strong lighting levels, the plant is growing away from the light source to protect itself.

By nutrient reset method, do you mean EI dosing?

What is your fertilizing routine?
 

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Don't mean to thread jack but kindda in the same one..:(
Zapins is it better to have nitrates at around 5ppm??or 0ppm because i have 0ppm and having same problems with hair algae too..
Also believe that high light & low nitrates just helps with the hair algae growth
 

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Better to keep your nitrates around 15ppm (in the 10-20 ppm range is fine) because you will have some wiggle room. You don't want your plants to ever run out of any nutrients because then they stop growing and that triggers algae problems.

15 ppm will prevent nitrate levels getting too low if you forget to dose or the plants were particularly productive and used more then usual.

Above about 20 ppm and you run the risk of triggering an algae bloom, and possible nutrient inhibition due to excess nitrogen.

If you are used to reef tanks, or saltwater systems where nitrate levels are best at 0 ppm, erase that mentality completely! Planted tanks need nitrates and nutrients and it won't cause algae in moderate amounts.
 

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Potassium nitrate can be used as a dry chemical, more fish food, or other nitrogen sources like urea or ammonia (in tiny doses) can be used. The later two might be problematic though and should be dosed with caution.

Have a look through the sponsor's web pages for dry compound fertilizers.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, here's my fertilizing routine. I replace 50% of the water once a week and dose only that water. So essentially only half the water is reset to the ideal parameters. I dose to get these parameters:
P: 0.5 mg/L
N: 7.5 mg/L
K: 20 mg/L
Mg: 5 mg/L
Fe and trace: 0.2-0.4mg/L

I do this as per the method of the person who sold me the dry ferts. It's worked out so far, until recently. I was also surprised at the rotala because the same bunch of rotala is clustered together in about 5in away and still grows vertical. It is also about 6in. taller, so I would assume that it would have shown more sideways growing than the shorter group.

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I saw you are using what looks like T12 or T8 fluorescent bulbs. They might not be putting out enough light, so that might make sense with the dead leaves.

As for your dosing, I suggest you increase P to about 2 ppm, and N to 15 ppm. The beauty with EI is that you can afford to dose more than you think and still be fine since the 50% water change removes nutrients from building up, this will also ensure that your plants don't develop deficiencies.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
ok, well should I add the ferts today or on my next water change on Mon? Also, I'm actually using 2x24 T5HO Geismann bulbs and 1 T12 15watt.
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2x24 T5HO Geismann bulbs are a great choice and will provide plenty of light for the plants. You should add the ferts sooner rather than later (so add them today) and then keep doing your water changes and dosing schedule as usual with the updated quantities.
 
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