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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I'm new to looking for local biotope plants. I've went looking the past couple days, but have drawn a blank. I really have no idea where or what to look for. Should I be looking in slower moving water/river, pools of water, boggy like area, lakes, drainage ditches, or streams?

So far I've looked in a stream that runs by my house, but it appears to me (the untrained eye) that there really isn't much/if any that would be well suited for an aquarium. It seems like the water may be to fast moving for the type of plants that I would be looking for. I really don't want plants that will rapidly grow out of the tank. I would like something that would be more suited to staying submersed in water.

Once I do find an area to look, how do I know what to look for? Are there tell tale signs that I should look for?

I'm in the Austin, TX area so I have a fairly wide variety of lakes, rivers, streams, etc. that I can go to.
 

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Bigole,

You're going to have the most luck looking in drainage ditches, ponds/lakes, pools, and on the banks of slower moving streams. Sometimes you'll find plants growing in the faster areas of a stream as well. When you do, you can be pretty sure that they're going to work as it's not likely that the main channel dries up and the plants will have been in water most of the year.

Unless you know specifically what the plants look like when grown emersed your best bet is to take a selection of plants you think are likely candidates and put them in your tank. Some will grow and others won't.

Best,
Phil
 

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Dear Bigoletankoffish,

You may not realize it, but you are smack in the middle of one of the most prolific areas of Texas. In fact the AGA convention was in Dallas, and their website shows everything they collected on their field trip, and south in San Marcos you can even collect Cryptocorynes. You just have to train your eyes. You probably passed over a half dozen plants that are suitable.

Go to the AGA website to see the last convention. The famous Kasellmann was leading the collecting:
http://www.aquatic-gardeners.org/show048/
See my website for local Texas stuff:
http://users.ev1.net/~spituch/Steve's Page/Aquarium/aquarium intro.html
See the San Marcos expedition:
http://users.ev1.net/~spituch/Steve's Page/Aquarium/Expedition 1/Expedition Intro.html
See this forum's article section:
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forum/cms_articles.php?cid=12

Just go do it!

Regards,
Steve Pituch
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. I've previously read a couple of those. The San Marcos trip really interested me.

I still have a lot of reading to do it appears. ;-)
 

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I'm in Michigan, and you can't walk a mile in any direction without stepping in some body of water. I have had the most luck with small lakes and ponds, though I admit I've never tried any drainage ditches. I even found some Val in a lake a few hundred miles north of here (vacation spot) that was bright red (pic attached), also a Nymphaea and a Nuphar, and even some Myriophyllum (I believe the species was M. sibiricum).

You'll usually have good luck with anything in a pond or lake; they typically contain more plants that will grow submersed.. The water levels are not usually as mercurial as those in flowing bodies of water and support submersed growth much better.
 

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I seem to recall Waller Creek, Pedernales Fall, and many other local ditches and bayous had lots of aquatic flora. I don't know if you go to UT, but when I was a student there my entomology professor took us to UT lab near Lake Austin. It's really close to Mozart's if you know what that is. There is a UT field lab there, and in it are dozens and dozens of pools and also the famed Lake Austin.......eh.......it actually looked more like a river. I don't know if you need a permit to be able to go in, but generally the staff there are really nice. Just ask politely and they might let you in. You just have to know where to park as UT is really PIA when it comes to ticketing parkings. If you're a Longhorn then you know what I'm talking about:p


Paul
 
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