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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,I have been keeping aquariums for a long time now and planted tanks with high lights for 5 years.I have quit high light tanks for 2 years now cause I got fed up with the algae,I thought that I should spend my time on low light tanks and enjoy my fish until the planted tank scene learns how to dose fertilizers,also aquarium products companies accept the macronutrient 'consept' and give back some feedback to the hobbyists or even develope some other useful products.Unfortunately this is not the case.I have been to interzoo exibition in Germany a couple of weeks ago and had a long discussion with the professor of a well known german company,it was then I realised that they only care for the masses and not the 'pioneer' hobbyist,for example they spend their time developing products for reducing nitrates for allthose who overstock,overfeed and have no plants=the masses=what makes profit.Introducing the idea that nitrates or phosphates might encourage plant growth is not good for the market.So I want to have a planted tank with no algae,I have the money,the time and can study as much as I have to..Where's the feedback??How many years will it take?2,5,10,how many?It has been some progress the last few years but I have to say we are still far from algae free planted tanks,what do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I am sorry if let to believe that this forum is not a valuable source of information,most of what I know about planted tanks came from this forum,all I am saying is that we need more sources of information
 

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Information is only available when someone learns something that becomes information. I don't believe anyone knows how to have a planted tank and no algae. Lots of people are able to do that, but I haven't noticed them spreading the word about what they did that worked so well. Even el natural type tanks have algae problems, judging by the posts in that forum here.

Avoiding algae seems to be a never ending challenge involving good cleaning practices, use of the right amount of light for the right amount of time per day, fertilizing correctly, good water circulation, and who knows what else. In any case, maybe you will be the one who finds a method or practice or substance that is "the answer" to algae problems. When you do, be sure to report it widely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If trial and error is the case,then let it be.By the way I see things going is a matter of time before those who are really eager to learn can have algae free tanks,in a few years perhaps but will happen.
 

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If I understand you correctly you are complaining about companies making more profit off many remedies for algae instead of one simple one that works like barley straw extract or something...

If I am right, I understand. I think some vendors in this hobby make their riches off selling snake oils...why bother clearing the air?!?!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well actually what I was complaining is that companies give emphasis to what the majority of fish keepers need and not the few who would like to grow planted tanks with co2,high light etc..so we end up having only each other for feedback and no help from the big companies,by this way it will take us much more time to work out the combination of all those parameters...
 

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You might want to look at one company, ADA, which is based in Japan. They exist solely to promote & service the planted aquarium community. They produce an entire line of aquariums, lighting, fertilizers, substrates, CO2 products, and even fish food.

I don't use most of their stuff becasue it is overpriced and I can accomplish the same things with my "DIY" equipment. Besides, part of the fun for me is building the system.

If you use their products to their specifications, you aren't guaranteed to have a successful tank, but you're likely to have success.

Another method that works is to obtain an understanding of the basic principles, and then using educated trial and error to obtain a nice tank.

That method is far more interesting IMO.
 

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I just wonder if avoiding the algae thing is like trying to have a dog not wag his tail. It seems like every bit of natural water has some algae in it somewhere at some time. We are trying to take a little scoop of that nature, bring it into our homes and replicate it's health. Algae is part of the food chain and I think it's here to stay. I know there are many who can avoid it most all of the time, but I wonder if there has been anyone that hasn't had some algae at one time or another in their tank. Just my thoughts. :D
 

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What is an acceptable level of algae to you? I agree with TG, algae is part of the 'eco-system' and is ubiquitous. I wipe off gda weekly with my water changes, and have some gsa on my Anubias, but otherwise, I do not have algae. Overall, I consider the tanks 'algae free'. But this may not be your definition of it.

So how much are you willing to put up with? Some folks may be able to have tanks that are visibly algae free. I tip my hat to those. But it doesn't diminish the vast majority of the rest of us who can manage to live with a small amount of algae which we deal with with basic maintenance. :) Of course, ymmv.
 

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I agree with Tex Gal and Bert H since I set up my planted tank 8years ago I've had most of the common types of aquarium algae including the dreaded BGA which appeared almost overnight as a 3in round patch on the gravel even though its quite a nice colour it was quickly removed. I think it had something to do with tapwater and its reaction with something on the gravel not with circulation as it was in an open area of the tank. GSA is a problem in this area so I remove any green spots that appear on the glass if I don't these spots produce long strands which spreads onto the plants. BBA is another which is on an Anubias nana in my tank at the moment most of this can be cleaned off the leaves by gently wiping with a cloth and the very bad leaves removed. When it appears on my sword plants I just take out the whole leaf from the base. Every now and then I use a phosphate remover in the filter as the phosphates in the local tapwater can be high. Water and algae have existed together for billions of years and if conditions are right algae will grow.

Liz
 
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