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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
if i want another drift wood, i'll never ever use those from Africa, except i find a really nice one! i know i have to cure it before i put it in my tank, but i was in rush. i change water 1/4 everyday. its been almost 3 weeks, and water still YELLOW. i got another Malaysia last week with no YELLOW problem!

Tim
 

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I usually boil it during all the afternoon changing a part of the water. if continuous loosen that color I put in a bucket during a pair of months and change water every week.
Particularly, it does not bother that color to me in the water. the fish feel more out of danger and are calmer.
 

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Put some charcoal in a little box filter and run it. Will pull the tannins out right away. Easy to take the box filter in and out as the tannins start to bug you. Over night should do it unless your tank is humongous.
 

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I just soaked mine outside for a week or so. The tannins arent really noticable anymore. I kind of like the look the tank gets when there are some tannins present.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
xtr-xtr said:
I usually boil it during all the afternoon changing a part of the water. if continuous loosen that color I put in a bucket during a pair of months and change water every week.
Particularly, it does not bother that color to me in the water. the fish feel more out of danger and are calmer.
i knew i have to boil it, but i didnt. i GOT lesson NOW!!! :roll:

Sue said:
Put some charcoal in a little box filter and run it. Will pull the tannins out right away. Easy to take the box filter in and out as the tannins start to bug you. Over night should do it unless your tank is humongous.
i did it, but it didnt really help! charcoal only pull chemical stuffs out i think.
i have charcoal in my both filters. :roll:

spituch said:
Gee, how does one boil a four-foot-long piece of driftwood? I'm hoping to find a six-foot piece for my 125 gallon tank. There's got to be a better way.

Steve
Steve,

how many bathroom you have? you know what i mean. dont ya? :wink:

Tim
 

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Hi Tim,
Please try to keep all your replies on one post and not a post for each reply. It makes it easy for all to scroll and read.
Thanks
Ken

Now to the driftwood subject. The only time I boil or microwave a driftwood if they leak out some kind of fungus that looks like jello. That only happens when I use Africa Maparni wood and woods that has not gone through the process of becoming driftwood yet. That make me believe that the so called Africa driftwood is harvest before it was ready just for the might dollar.
When I pick out a driftwood, I look for color and texture besides the shape..
The shape is important for the overall dimension, but the color and texture creates the feeling of depth and age of the tank.
Depending on the placement and the amount of light, that works into the amount of time I need to soak the piece.
If a driftwood is dark brown and is placed in a low light area, it will only turn out black with no texture when looking through a camera lens.
I soak each driftwood in a trash can or tub with 10-15% bleach to remove the tanner to give it the gray old look.
I then rinse and soak it in water to remove the bleach for another week.
Driftwood and rocks should look old and dead in most designs, that will balance it out with living which is plants and fish.
If you have a metal trash can, you can boil a large driftwood outdoors under a camp fire and also make smores.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ryuken168 said:
Hi Tim,
Please try to keep all your replies on one post and not a post for each reply. It makes it easy for all to scroll and read.
Thanks
Ken

Now to the driftwood subject. The only time I boil or microwave a driftwood if they leak out some kind of fungus that looks like jello. That only happens when I use Africa Maparni wood and woods that has not gone through the process of becoming driftwood yet. That make me believe that the so called Africa driftwood is harvest before it was ready just for the might dollar.
When I pick out a driftwood, I look for color and texture besides the shape..
The shape is important for the overall dimension, but the color and texture creates the feeling of depth and age of the tank.
Depending on the placement and the amount of light, that works into the amount of time I need to soak the piece.
If a driftwood is dark brown and is placed in a low light area, it will only turn out black with no texture when looking through a camera lens.
I soak each driftwood in a trash can or tub with 10-15% bleach to remove the tanner to give it the gray old look.
I then rinse and soak it in water to remove the bleach for another week.
Driftwood and rocks should look old and dead in most designs, that will balance it out with living which is plants and fish.
If you have a metal trash can, you can boil a large driftwood outdoors under a camp fire and also make smores.

Ken
sorry Ken! how to keep replies on one post ? thats why my nickname is pighead. :roll:

Tim
 

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If you have a lake nearby why not just chuck the driftwood in the lake instead of soaking it. Wouldn't that work out better? Ken what kind of wood do you like to bleach? Do you think Amano bleaches his mangrove wood? Asking because i use mangrove and wonder if it will look good through a camera lens.
 

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It might come in contact with parasites or chemicals in the lake, so I wouldn't take that chance.
I only worked with Malaysian driftwood and have not try Mangrove wood yet.

Ken
 
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